Perspective

 

Last night I read that Anguilla was in the direct path of Category 5 Hurricane Irma.  The hurricane’s eye hit the island early this morning. With wind speeds clocked at 185+ mph and surf surges 7-11′, Hurricane Irma left a catastrophic mark on this tranquil, beloved island.

 

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“The Edge,” Shoal Bay East

 

 

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Walkway to the beach, Shoal Bay Villas

 

 

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Anguilla, “Tranquility Wrapped in Blue”

 

 

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Anguilla gets my vote for “Best Beach in the World”

 

Being a travel photographer, I never leave a location without being affected or without my heartstrings being tugged. It’s as if the people and place are permanently cataloged in my mind – the smells, the sounds, the tastes, the sights and the feelings never die. The senses are reintroduced through the saved imagery, and I feel a closeness.  Visiting my photo archives last night, I prepared for the storm by looking through my favorite Anguilla images.  I didn’t have to hide from the incoming, ferocious storm, brace myself against deadly winds, secure my house from rising flood waters or see torn-off roofs, downed trees or snapped-in-two power lines. Instead, securely inside my house, 3200 miles away, I worried about what Anguillians would face in the morning, and with this kindred spiritedness, I felt as if I was right next door to my neighbor.

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Post-Irma: The Pumphouse, my favorite Sandy Ground, Anguilla hang-out

 

This morning, while Hurricane Irma pummeled Anguilla, I attended my Wednesday workout class in Arizona.  The motivational topic was perspective.

When you see a field of dandelions, do you think,

a bunch of weeds 

or do you think,

a bunch of wishes?

No matter where we go in the world, we all desire shelter – a place to retreat to have safety and security, and when our shelter is threatened or wiped-out, we are lost – where do we go? what do we do?

How do we survive?

We grieve for what was and celebrate when the sun comes out.

– dandelions grow like crazy when the sun’s out –

Focusing on rebuilding the beauty

if we didn’t lose our lives.

Perspective.

Pick at endless weeds or choose to make innumerable wishes –

Anguillians are strong, gracious, and positive-thinking, and I’m fairly certain they will choose the latter

Perspective.

 

 

Heaven on a Stick

Don’t blame the fence, blame the gardener.

White picket fences don’t just happen.

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“That’s heaven on a stick!”

– Mrs. Jane Young, my first boss.

Mrs. Young liked perfection.

One Saturday in 1985, I arrived to work at 8 AM, and Mrs. Young gave me the day’s instructions.

“I’d like you to organize and display all the sterling silver and crystal in the display cases.”

She pointed to the hand-carved, mahogany, floor-to-ceiling shelving behind the waist-high, enclosed glass jewelry sales cabinets.  I knew from a prior conversation that Mrs. Young adored the cabinetry since it was a family heirloom and it was the primary design fixture of her family-owned jewelry store.

With no further instructions, she left for the day.

To say I was intimidated, at age 16, handling the fine silver and crystal and placing the valuables in the gargantuan, cherished cabinetry, is an understatement.

I worked a straight 8 hours, right through my lunch hour. I remember being a nervous wreck the entire day –

Am I leaving fingerprints?

Is that too high?

Does that look good next to this or does this look good next to that?  

Is this lighting going to help this sell? 

Fifteen minutes before the 5 PM close, Mrs. Young entered the store.

Arriving in her blue, crisply-ironed pantsuit with a silk, floral scarf tied at her neckline, she, an ex-NYC runway model, was exquisite looking, and she, herself, downright intimidating.

She gazed at the shelves, inspecting the design, and as I recall, after only 2 minutes or so, she looked me in the eye and gave her appraisal,

“This looks like crap. Now let me show you how it should be done.”

We worked overtime, transforming what I had made look like crap into what Mrs. Young expected and envisioned.

And on that day, I learned a valuable life lesson.

We may think we know what perfection looks like, but it takes more than hard work.

It’s takes listening, learning, accepting criticism, and paying attention to detail, plus a whole lot of practice.

It also takes heart, respect,

and a whole lot of desire,

and if it has true value and worth

we may have to focus for an entire day – maybe even weeks, months and years –

if it’s going to be deemed

“heaven on a stick!”

“That’s heaven on a stick!” (not “that looks like crap,”) has stuck with me since my inaugural design day in Mrs. Young’s jewelry store.

Mrs. Young left her perfect mark on me, and I credit Mrs. Young for teaching me a secret of sales –

how do you make others want what you have?

Invest in good gardeners.

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Looks Can Be Deceiving

Would you believe me if I told you while taking these photos, the conditions were almost unbearable?

The cold and blustery winds forced all the golfers off the course and into the clubhouse for an early happy hour.  While the Spanish Bay lit up with patrons on the inside, only a few of us ventured outside. Following the deceptive, bright sun,  I, the only one not in a parka, crouched down on the fairway path, allowing the sculpted golf fairway landscape to break the wind. In a sumo squat, I shot the last moment of Mother’s Day eve as the sun set over the Pacific Ocean, and as I walked away, a mother myself, I thought, nothing is exactly how it seems unless we’ve lived it, is it?

I believe

Looks can be deceiving.

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