Perspective

 

Last night I read that Anguilla was in the direct path of Category 5 Hurricane Irma.  The hurricane’s eye hit the island early this morning. With wind speeds clocked at 185+ mph and surf surges 7-11′, Hurricane Irma left a catastrophic mark on this tranquil, beloved island.

 

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“The Edge,” Shoal Bay East

 

 

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Walkway to the beach, Shoal Bay Villas

 

 

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Anguilla, “Tranquility Wrapped in Blue”

 

 

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Anguilla gets my vote for “Best Beach in the World”

 

Being a travel photographer, I never leave a location without being affected or without my heartstrings being tugged. It’s as if the people and place are permanently cataloged in my mind – the smells, the sounds, the tastes, the sights and the feelings never die. The senses are reintroduced through the saved imagery, and I feel a closeness.  Visiting my photo archives last night, I prepared for the storm by looking through my favorite Anguilla images.  I didn’t have to hide from the incoming, ferocious storm, brace myself against deadly winds, secure my house from rising flood waters or see torn-off roofs, downed trees or snapped-in-two power lines. Instead, securely inside my house, 3200 miles away, I worried about what Anguillians would face in the morning, and with this kindred spiritedness, I felt as if I was right next door to my neighbor.

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Post-Irma: The Pumphouse, my favorite Sandy Ground, Anguilla hang-out

 

This morning, while Hurricane Irma pummeled Anguilla, I attended my Wednesday workout class in Arizona.  The motivational topic was perspective.

When you see a field of dandelions, do you think,

a bunch of weeds 

or do you think,

a bunch of wishes?

No matter where we go in the world, we all desire shelter – a place to retreat to have safety and security, and when our shelter is threatened or wiped-out, we are lost – where do we go? what do we do?

How do we survive?

We grieve for what was and celebrate when the sun comes out.

– dandelions grow like crazy when the sun’s out –

Focusing on rebuilding the beauty

if we didn’t lose our lives.

Perspective.

Pick at endless weeds or choose to make innumerable wishes –

Anguillians are strong, gracious, and positive-thinking, and I’m fairly certain they will choose the latter

Perspective.

 

 

Extra Oxygen

In December 2016, my friends, a father/daughter team, organized a blood drive, and I signed up.  I’d never donated blood, but

J⁴ needed a blood transfusion.  The 12-week chemo/immunotherapy treatment had lowered her blood counts to a point where she desperately needed a life-saving boost. She needed three separate blood transfusions.

Although I knew she wouldn’t receive my blood, I went into the blood drive thinking about her need and about how having her blood type available saved her life. Someone else had given his/her blood for her to live.

I answered, in a private room, the medical history questions – some questions pretty basic, have you lived overseas for more than five years during 1980 -? And some questions downright personal, have you ever paid for sex?  have you ever had gay sex?  I got my finger pricked to draw a bead of blood to check my iron levels. I had my blood pressure and pulse taken.

Then I stretched out on a portable hospital bed and had a pint of blood drawn via IV. I squeezed a rubber ball to encourage the blood flow. When I finished giving, the nurse took an extra seven vials of blood for testing.

I didn’t coast through the whole thing – actually, I had some light headedness and nausea which I’ve now learned is normal.  After donating, I went to bed early, but in the AM, I felt fine.

I thought about the 12 weeks I accompanied J⁴ to chemo.  The needles that stuck her – blood tests, chemo IV, immunotherapy IV.  The machines she’s laid in and tables and hospital beds she’s laid on while having CT scans, radiation and doctor visits. The Penguin Cold Caps we put on her head every 20 minutes before, during and after the treatments.  How cold the caps felt on my gloved hands as I readied them, yet J⁴ had to endure the ice-cold caps wrapped around her head and also carry the worry, will I  save my hair? (which she did!)

A few weeks after donating blood, I received an email from the American Red Cross, asking if I’d give blood again, after 56 days, the required time between giving. Without hesitation, I downloaded the Red Cross’ blood donation app and scheduled my next donation.  I’ve now given 3x since December, and I receive notifications when I’m able to give again.

On my 2nd blood drive visit, I met a woman in the ‘recovery area’ where salty and sugary snacks and waters are served. The woman ate Chips Ahoy cookies while I munched on Cheez-Its.  She told me that she had worked in a trauma unit in an east coast hospital for over 30+ years.  She said she’d given blood, on schedule, for the last 15 years. She witnessed a patient who required 100 units of blood (a person can only give 1 unit/pint, so 100 people saved one life!) and who then fully recovered from his injuries. After seeing the miracle, she committed to giving.

I listened to a Canvas-SF service this week while I strung a NeckGrace. It was about minimalism; Less is More.

“Minimalism is not about having less stuff but it’s about being free to do more which matters. True life, that which is real and full, is found at the intersection of simplicity and generosity. You make a living by what you get, and you make a life by what you give away. Passing blame that you don’t have time is absolving yourself from responsibility – cuz you ‘B-lame” when you blame other things for owning your time. Are you making a living or making a life? Love and hurry are fundamentally incompatible – hurried people can’t love. Love takes time. Will you open your hands and loosen your grip on the more that you’re pursuing, so you may have true life.” – Travis

In 2012, healthy and well, three years before lung cancer, J⁴ traveled with us to our family’s favorite beach in the world, Anguilla.  For some local flavor, we recommended she read the book, A Trip to the Beach: Living on Island Time in the Caribbean, written by Melinda and Robert Blanchard, who gave up most of their worldly possessions and most of what they were familiar and moved to Anguilla and started a restaurant, Blanchards. J⁴ loved the book, so once on the island, she went to Blanchards and met the owners. She bought a hat, and they signed it –

I photographed J⁴ on the Anguilla beach wearing her treasured signed hat.

IMG_8113picWe took the photo next to these:

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“Extra Oxygen”

Five years ago, I had no idea that the beauty of these tanks in the foreground to the most beautiful water in the world foreshadowed J⁴’s necessity for extra oxygen.  The extra oxygen that will buy her time; time to read books, time to share with her beloved husband and boys, time to visit places that bring her joy and time to impact the lives of those around her by all that she gives.

Breathe life into yourself by giving blood, extra oxygen, sweat & tears and love in any way, shape or form.

‘Cuz real life doesn’t allow us to take a timeout when the going gets rough, and after we’re gone, the stuff we’ve acquired becomes someone else’s clutter, but what we give away sets us free!

Like when we take a trip to the beach – we keep it simple – some sunscreen, glasses or a good book – all the rest is extra – extra clutter – blocking us from the simplicity and a true life.

Don’t b-lame – give your extra away.

 

 

 

Benefit of the Doubt

“Maybe you’re standing on the side of a cliff, stuck on if; wondering,

Can I entrust myself to him? Can I commit myself even though I doubt?

If I take a leap, will he catch me?”

When vacationing on Anguilla, I partook in a rare recreation for me.

I read a book.

Coincidentally, the book, Faith & Doubt, by John Ortberg, led me to a place, like Anguilla; a place where tranquility allows me to explore my doubts and where familiarity and comfort permit me to see the beauty derived from my faith. It’s a leap of faith to give something or someone the benefit of the doubt – to decide to believe, even though we’re not sure that what is being said or being done is true.

It’s a decision to have faith,

and through my faith, ultimately,  I’m able to see beyond the cliffs

and to accept

without a doubt, I should read more often; not for only recreation, but also for purpose.

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“Beyond The Doubt”